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  • E-News U. Contributor 8:59 am on April 12, 2013 Permalink |
    Tags: , , Scripps Howard School,   

    ‘Central Park Five’ screening at Hampton U. 

    By Keilah Joyner

    Imagine having spent between six and 13 years confined to jail cells for crimes you did not commit? In a country that professes to provide justice and equality for all, the ultimate miscarriage of justice occurred in 1989.

    “The Central Park Five” is a riveting documentary that examines the 1989 case of one Latino and four black boys wrongly accused and convicted of raping a white woman in Central Park.

    Created, directed, and produced by Ken Burns, David McMahon and Sarah Burns, “The Central Park Five” aims to reveal the truth behind the case that shook the nation by surprise from 1989 until now.
    On the evening of April 19, 1989, Trisha Meili, 28, went for a jog in New York’s Central Park. Nearly four hours later, she was found beaten, raped, and bounded.

    Antron McCray, 15, Kevin Richardson, 14, Raymond Santana, 14, Kharey Wise, 15, and Yusef Salaam, 15, were in the same park that night, the teenagers acknowledged to police.
    During the period of rising crime rates and racial tension, New York City Police Department was under pressure solve the high-profile sex crime, even if that meant arresting five teenage boys for the major felony.

    Once arrested and transported to the police station, the boys were pressured during police interrogations to implicate one another in the crime. Later all the boys except Yusef Salaam were charged with the crime.
    The New York Daily News covered the maximum sentencing hearing.

    “Sooner or later the truth will come out,” said Salaam. “Time can never contain a black man as long as he knows he was convicted falsely.”

    Yusef Salaam words came into fruition in 2002. That year, Matias Reyes, a male convict, confessed to beating and raping the Wall Street executive.

    In 2002, the convictions of four of the five boys, now men, were dismissed, but the damage has long been done.

    The night of the Central Park rape changed the lives of McCray, Richardson, Santana, Wise, and Salaam forever.

    “The Central Park Five” documents the crime, whereabouts, and how the men are attempting to cope in a country that prides itself on justice that served them a great injustice.

    The April 11 20-minute screening of “The Central Park Five” at Hampton University shows how 24 years later the case still captures the attention and questions of many people.

    “A lot of people did not do their jobs,” said New York Times reporter Jim Dwyer on camera. “The police, reporters, and lawyers failed.”

    Today, civil unrest and crime rates declined significantly in New York City. “We are evolving, but there are still some things that are going to shock our senses,” said HU Assistant Professor Wayne Dawkins during a panel discussion after the screening.

    Justice should not be limited to those who are of one race and one stature. The Central Park Five is just one of the documented cases of where our justice system has failed.

    The men falsely accused of raping Trisha Meili are filing a lawsuit against New York City.

    “The Central Park Five” can be viewed in its entirety on April 16 on PBS stations.

    The writer is a student in the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications

    ‘Central Park Five’ trailer: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2380247/

    New York Daily News coverage of the sentencing: http://www.nydailynews.com/services/central-park-five/central-park-attackers-sentenced-max-article-1.1304884

     
  • E-News U. Contributor 8:54 am on April 12, 2013 Permalink |
    Tags: , , Scripps Howard School,   

    Powerful discussion of ‘Central Park Five’ film at Hampton U. 

    By Dedrain Davis

    Nineteen eighty nine: New York City, America’s biggest city was facing issues of the decade. Social and racial tensions ran high.

    Released at the end of 2012, “The Central Park Five” a documentary film by Ken Burns, Sarah Burns and David McMahon, examined the Central Park Jogger case of 1989. The film includes inside commentary of major social and political players in New York at the time.

    “In 1984, the crack epidemic increased crime” says Ed Koch, mayor at the time. The Rev. Al Sharpton said “New York is now the capital of racial violence.” There was the Howard Beach case (1986), Tawana Brawley case (1987) and now the riveting story of the Central Park Five.

    On Thursday April 11, Hampton University’s Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications hosted a screening and panel discussion about the “Central Park Five” film. The event began with a welcome by Drew Berry, a visiting professor at Scripps Howard School. Barbara Lee Hamm, host and executive producer with WHRO-TV 15, then introduced the film and acted as the evenings’ moderator for the panel discussion. The 20-minute preview of “The Central Park Five” was just enough to leave students on the edge of their seats and spark a valuable panel discussion.

    On the panel was Earl Caldwell, writer-in-residence at Scripps Howard, Eric Claville, assistant professor of political science and history and Wayne Dawkins, assistant professor and author at Scripps Howard.

    Claville, also a lawyer, was able to offer informative material discussing the interrogation tactics of the police involved in the Central Park Five case, specifically the history of “custodial interrogation.”

    In response to a question from the audience, Dawkins, a New York native, added “Blacks were collateral damage.” He went on to emphasize the pressures of society and the media for the police to find suspects. Audience members offered commentary and asked questions that made for a passionate and informative discussion.

    Hamm ended the night by asking the panel “Can the Central Park Five” happen in 2013?”
    In response, Caldwell referred to New York’s’ “Stop and Frisk Law” that allows police to question and search and person suspected of committing a crime. “Stop and frisk is a proxy for black and brown kids ages 13 to 22,” said Caldwell. “If this isn’t racial profiling I don’t know what is. Some black people supported it.”

    Claville ended the discussion saying that education and entertainment plays a major role in our communities. “It takes more than a village,” said Claville. “It takes a community to have a better society.”
    Ciera Edwards, a sophomore business student from Minnesota said “This was a thought- provoking case, especially for the students my age.”

    The documentary in its entirety will be aired 9 p.m. April 16 on WHRO TV15.

    The writer is a student in the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications

    Custodial interrogation: http://www.mirandarights.org/custodialinterrogation.html

    Stop and frisk data: http://www.nyclu.org/content/stop-and-frisk-data

     
  • E-News U. Contributor 11:53 am on April 27, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , Holly Tree Inn, parking, Scripps Howard School   

    Makeover: Holly Tree Inn lot converted into parking spaces 

    By Brittany S. Brown

    Hampton University has undergone a great series of transformations, ranging from new buildings, to new programs and modern technology. This week a dirt lot behind the Holly Tree Inn and across the street from the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications was converted into a parking lot for a handful of vehicles.

    Before the conversion, students and faculty members have walked about the area, kicking rocks and occasionally dragging gravel along the lines of their footwear.

    Kanesha Brown, a senior architecture major from Hartford, Conn., describes it as “one of the most convenient transformations” she’s witnessed in all of her years at Hampton.

     “My feet would look like I came from the Flintstones’ era. I hated those rocks,” she said. “My shoes would always carry lots of dust when I would pass by that area.”

    Janaia Smith, a junior nursing major from Seattle, recalls the time she would occasionally walk by. “When I stayed in McGrew [Towers], I would always take the same routes to class [and it] seemed as though that parking lot wasn’t being taken care of. Now it looks more clean and put together.”

    “The lot looks really nice. said Omari Miles, a freshman, sports management major from Newtown, Conn. “I usually don’t walk that way very often, but in comparison to the last time I saw it, it looks so much better.”

    Mark Hall, a freshman business management major from Northern Virginia, said he would walk with his friends who stayed in Holmes Hall: “We would always stumble over those rocks. One time, I even tripped. I’m so glad to see that the area is all fixed up. This is a really good look for Hampton.”

    Holly Tree Inn, a campus dormitory and faculty dining room, has been known to attract visitors and tourists for its unique appeal as well as its delicious down-home meals. Now, visitors are free to park in appropriate spaces specifically designed for vehicles, and getting their cars muddy is no longer a factor.

    Scripps Howard Faculty members are in the same boat. Along with students, there is literally a common ground for the faculty to comfortably walk over.

    The newly remodeled parking lot serves as one of the many ventures to the transformation of Hampton University.

    The writer is a junior in the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications

     

     
  • E-News U. Contributor 9:38 am on April 5, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: ABC-TV, crisis management, , Judy Smith, Kerry Washington, Scandal, Scripps Howard School   

    Real-life ‘Scandal’ figure was special guest at Hampton U. 

    By Nakiya Morgan

    Shonda Rhimes, creator and executive producer for hit shows “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Private Practice” is bringing a new drama to ABC-TV Thursday evening.

    “Scandal” is based on a public relations professional named Judy Smith, and her team.

    As a pioneer in crisis management for over 25 years, Smith has made her mark as a woman who is about her business. The show will highlight her communication skills as well as her legal input on various challenges that she has faced.

    Smith represented Michael Vick, Monica Lewinsky and most recently the BP case and the handling of its cleanup of a Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

    Smith is no stranger to Hampton University. On Oct. 19, Smith visited the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications as part of a lecture series.

    In hopes to inspire students, Smith discussed her experience in the world of public relations, crisis management and law. She stressed the value and importance of perfecting the craft and how important it is to mange crisis situations.

    Paige Delaney, a sophomore, public relations major from Chicago, believed that “‘Scandal’ is a “must see for anyone trying to pursue a career in the public relations field.

    “I am definitely going to watch the show. I believe that I can adopt a lot of skills that Judy Smith has just by tuning in every Thursday. The show can teach you a lot about her life, but most importantly how to react under certain crisis situations.”

    Kerry Washington will play the invisible power force Judy Smith 10 p.m. EST, Thursday, April 5 on ABC-TV.

    The writer is a student at the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications

     
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